The England North Bank City of Preston

Preston was named England’s most improved city in 2018. This laurel was worth winning for this ancient city.

A Street in Preston

Preston is a city on the north bank of the River Ribble in North England. It is the administrative center of Lancashire County. As of 2017, Preston was estimated to have a population of 141, 300. Like other British Isles, Preston has a temperate maritime climate.

History:

Preston was formerly a water village. It was developed from an Anglican settlement around the 7th century. The name was derived from ‘Priest’s town’ and was later changed to Preston. The village became a town in the 12th century.

At the time, Preston served as the main road between Northern and Southern England. As Preston was a major market scene, it had stone gates for charging goods entering the town. Preston was also a stage for some national battles: the 1648 Battle between Cromwell and the Duke of Hamilton and the defeat of the Jacobites in 1715.

Preston became the seat of the new county council in 1882. Preston by-pass was the nation’s first motorway and it worked greatly in addressing traffic problems.

The town’s old homes, factories and buildings were soon demolished to accommodate modernist county buildings. Preston escaped serious bombing during the Second World War but a plane crashed into it in 1944. 66 people died from the crash.

The present University of Lancashire can be traced as far back as the Preston Sunday School in 1830. Preston became a city in 2002.  

Governance:

Preston is divided into two Westminster constituencies namely; Preston and Wyre and Preston North. The seat of the Lancashire County Council is in Fishergate. Preston is run by Preston City Council with the urban settlements having 19 out of 20 seats.

Landmarks and Tourist Attractions:

The tallest non-cathedral church spire in England is St. Walburge. The church spire can be seen from almost anywhere in the city. Preston bus station was built in the 1960s and is one of the largest bus stations in England.

Harris Museum is a Victorian style building which houses arts and artifacts. The building also overlooks the Flag Market. Preston Cenotaph is a monument for Preston soldiers lost during the World War I and World War II.

Other memorable places are the River Ribble, Samlesbury Hall, Deepdale Stadium, Preston Docks, Miller Arcade, Astley Hall, Smithy Farm and the Blackburn Cathedral.

Economy:

Preston is a booming economic world. The city has never lost its touch for commercial activities. Preston has above average improvement in the health, transport, labour and transportation sectors. Preston houses The Carphone Warehouse, Skittles and The Westinghouse Electric Company. It also houses the popular aerospace company, BAE Systems.

Due to Preston’s location, there are a lot of freight and haulage companies. Preston was named in 2018 as England’s most improved city.  

Sports:

Preston is a home of football, the city used to house the National Football Museum before it was moved to Manchester. Preston North End FC was one of the founders of the Football League. The team was the first crowned English Football Champions. The team plays at Deepdale Football Ground.

Preston also has a female football team; Dick Kerr’s Ladies FC which won the first two seasons of the Football League.

Preston Grasshoppers RFC plays in the third tier of the English rugby union. Other sports established in the city include mountaineering, hockey, roller derby, cycle reaching and speedway racing.

Nightlife: 

Preston does not have the best nightlife in England, but the city isn’t dead either. Preston provides some amazingly cheap pubs, live music from top bands, and lots of clubs.

Conclusion:

Preston is a great city to live in. There are amazing business opportunities and a host of historical centers one can visit to help unwind after work. It certainly fits in as an amazing stop on the list of the leading UK destinations.