Discover The Most Exciting Top 6 Road Trips in London

The avid tourist knows that a road trip brings out the best of every place you visit. It is time to explore the best of London’s road trips.

6 Best Road Trips In London

That feeling you get when you could just hire a car and set it at your own pace, surfing the whole of a place is so over whelming.

Having been one of the most visited places in the world, London over the years has attracted lots of tourists. The definitive list presented here will give you the best trip to London you could ever experience.

  1. Cardiff to Conwy, Wale

One of the best ways to see in Wales is by driving from coast to coast. The A470 runs all the way from Cardiff in the south to Conwy in the north, taking in two Natinal Parks.


You begin from the Welsh capital, then move through the South Wales Coalfield to the Brecon Beacons.

When you reach the Heartland of Wales, you will pass by the Llyn Clywedog reservoir and then to the market town of Dolgellau, before heading over to the northern mountains of Snowdonia to Conwy.

Top tip: avoid huge luggage so as to ensure smooth and fast trip especially at the mountains.

2. Atlantic Highway, South West England

Been amongst the longest roads in the South West, the A39 connects Bath to Falmouth.

The road doesn’t get close to the coast as such you will be able to make lots of breathtaking views of the Atlantic as you pass Bude, through Camelford and to Wadebridge.

Top tip: there might be traffic on A39 as such it is best avoided in peak holidays to avoid congestions.

Distance and duration: 77 miles, 1-2 days.

3.Snake Pass- Peak District, England

This located in the Derbyshire section of the peak district, which crosses the Pennines and Ladybower Reservoir.


It also carries the A57, a road that coonects Sheffield with Manchester.

Top tip: snug corners might be present and twisting tarmac as you tackle the tangled route.

Distance and duration: 42 miles, 3 days.

4.Cheddar Gorge- Somerset, England

This is located in the heart of the West Country. It is located 10 miles South West of Bristol and 8 miles east of Weston-Super-Mare.

An amazing view makes tourists to stare in awe, the road appears as though the earth is opening up to reveal deep-sliced limestone cliff.

Top tip: Got to be careful with twisting turns as you surge your way into this fabulous route.

Distance and duration: 15 miles, 2 days.

5.Chase Welsh dragons over the Black Mountain Pass

This rolls between Llandovery in the north, crossing the dragon’s humps of Pont Aber and Herbert’s Pass pat nice viewing points, before sinking low and cascading down to Gwaun-Cae-Gurwen.

Top tip: make sure you tackle the route north to south.

Distance: 1 day.

6. Causeway Coastal Route, Northern Ireland

Here the route is made up of nine scenic drives, this will make you able to make the journey in bits such that you will be able to enjoy each and every bit of your journey.
You get to see lots of the Northern Ireland’s main tourist attractions and Land marks. Places such as; the Glens of Antrim, Dark hedges, The Giant’s Causeway.

Top tip: be at alert with your wing mirrors because most of the route are narrow.
Distance and duration: 120 miles, 3-5 days.

It is time to plan for your road trip from London. Hope you found these routes enchanting? Go to your travel agent now and make your bookings.

5 Theaters You Need to Visit in London

Visiting London? You need to visit the 5 leading theaters to spice up your stay. Here are our best picks.

THE BEST THEATERS IN LONDON

London Skyline By Shutterstock

London is undoubtedly a home of all things classic and the theater is definitely not left out. Whether you are setting out for heart gripping dramas or harmonious musicals, it’s hard to find a city that pours them out like London. Here are some of the best theaters in the city.

1) SHAKESPEARE’S GLOBE THEATRE
This theatre was first constructed in 1599 and was formerly used for acting only Shakespearean plays.

It however got reconstructed in 1997. It is also called The Globe. It’s a theatre with over 2000 capacity with more than 1000 seating spaces.

Not only is the theatre renowned, it currently houses another theatre named The Sam Wanamaker Theatre, a 340 seats theatre.

Like the name suggests, the theater has a round structure that lets you have a clear view.

Shutterstock Image of London Scenery


The theater is at New Globe Walk in Bank side and generally runs from May till October.

2) HAROLD PINTER THEATER


This theatre is located at Panton Street with a 796 capacity. It was original named The Royal Comedy Centre when it first opened in 1881 as a comic opera house.

The theater has a four level auditorium and is wheel chair accessible. It also houses a nice bar. The theater became famous when the then producers during the First World War created a revue that became really popular.

One of the most famous shows at the theater is Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Which aired in 2017. The theater is still strongly known for comedies and musicals.

3) THE OLD VIC

London skyline by Shutterstock-Evening View


The Old Vic is an elegant theatre with a scenic view. The theatre is at The Cut, near Waterloo Station with over a thousand capacity. The theatre was built in 1818 and was originally named Royal Coburg Theatre.

It was nicknamed The Old Vic and the name became formalized in 1925. It was formerly home to the National Theatre until 1976, when it was moved to South Bank.

The theater saw some damage during The Second World War but was renovated later and it became a Grade II building.


It has a three level auditorium and comes with great facilities.

4) REGENT’S PARK OPEN AIR THEATER


This is a unique theater at Regent’s Park with 1200 capacity. The open air theater, established by a registered non-profit theater company, has been in London since 1932.

The theater runs through May till September (probably because it’s an open space that needs the summer weather}. The award winning theater is known for its beautiful musicals. It also has a peculiarity for Shakespeare and comedy.

Although you can’t get a ticket refund because of a bad weather, the theater allows you to switch shows.

5) NATIONAL THEATER


The national theatre is on the South Bank. It has four auditoriums: Olivier Theatre, Lyttleton Theatre, Dorfman Theatre and Temporary Theatre. The theatre produces about 25 shows every year and is involved in every part of the theatre business.

From family entertainment to rib-cracking comedies and musicals, the national theater doles them all out with standard.


The theatre boasts of nice restaurants, bars, bookstores, exhibitions and a great parking space.


It’s easier to make bookings before setting out to any of the theaters because of seat limitations. London promises a great theater experience.

The England North Bank City of Preston

Preston was named England’s most improved city in 2018. This laurel was worth winning for this ancient city.

A Street in Preston

Preston is a city on the north bank of the River Ribble in North England. It is the administrative center of Lancashire County. As of 2017, Preston was estimated to have a population of 141, 300. Like other British Isles, Preston has a temperate maritime climate.

History:

Preston was formerly a water village. It was developed from an Anglican settlement around the 7th century. The name was derived from ‘Priest’s town’ and was later changed to Preston. The village became a town in the 12th century.

At the time, Preston served as the main road between Northern and Southern England. As Preston was a major market scene, it had stone gates for charging goods entering the town. Preston was also a stage for some national battles: the 1648 Battle between Cromwell and the Duke of Hamilton and the defeat of the Jacobites in 1715.

Preston became the seat of the new county council in 1882. Preston by-pass was the nation’s first motorway and it worked greatly in addressing traffic problems.

The town’s old homes, factories and buildings were soon demolished to accommodate modernist county buildings. Preston escaped serious bombing during the Second World War but a plane crashed into it in 1944. 66 people died from the crash.

The present University of Lancashire can be traced as far back as the Preston Sunday School in 1830. Preston became a city in 2002.  

Governance:

Preston is divided into two Westminster constituencies namely; Preston and Wyre and Preston North. The seat of the Lancashire County Council is in Fishergate. Preston is run by Preston City Council with the urban settlements having 19 out of 20 seats.

Landmarks and Tourist Attractions:

The tallest non-cathedral church spire in England is St. Walburge. The church spire can be seen from almost anywhere in the city. Preston bus station was built in the 1960s and is one of the largest bus stations in England.

Harris Museum is a Victorian style building which houses arts and artifacts. The building also overlooks the Flag Market. Preston Cenotaph is a monument for Preston soldiers lost during the World War I and World War II.

Other memorable places are the River Ribble, Samlesbury Hall, Deepdale Stadium, Preston Docks, Miller Arcade, Astley Hall, Smithy Farm and the Blackburn Cathedral.

Economy:

Preston is a booming economic world. The city has never lost its touch for commercial activities. Preston has above average improvement in the health, transport, labour and transportation sectors. Preston houses The Carphone Warehouse, Skittles and The Westinghouse Electric Company. It also houses the popular aerospace company, BAE Systems.

Due to Preston’s location, there are a lot of freight and haulage companies. Preston was named in 2018 as England’s most improved city.  

Sports:

Preston is a home of football, the city used to house the National Football Museum before it was moved to Manchester. Preston North End FC was one of the founders of the Football League. The team was the first crowned English Football Champions. The team plays at Deepdale Football Ground.

Preston also has a female football team; Dick Kerr’s Ladies FC which won the first two seasons of the Football League.

Preston Grasshoppers RFC plays in the third tier of the English rugby union. Other sports established in the city include mountaineering, hockey, roller derby, cycle reaching and speedway racing.

Nightlife: 

Preston does not have the best nightlife in England, but the city isn’t dead either. Preston provides some amazingly cheap pubs, live music from top bands, and lots of clubs.

Conclusion:

Preston is a great city to live in. There are amazing business opportunities and a host of historical centers one can visit to help unwind after work. It certainly fits in as an amazing stop on the list of the leading UK destinations.