5 Best Places to Eat Out in London

For tourists and people who are new to London, knowing where to eat what can be a big advantage. Here are our best picks

Time Out Image of Electric Diner

London is among the busiest cities in the world. Perhaps, this is one of the reasons why it is a food capital. There are so many restaurants in the city; from age-proven British restaurants and fine dining restaurants to trendy fast-food places,

London has it all. Because there are so many out there, it may be a bit difficult to choose. But here are five guaranteed restaurants with mouth-watering, sumptuous meals, nice atmosphere and amazing customer service.

1) FINE DINING RESTAURANT –ALAIN DUCASSE AT THE DORCHESTER

This restaurant at Mayfair boasts of three Michelin stars and eating there will tell you why. It has a very elegant atmosphere that is not too stifling but pleasurable as well.

The food is simply amazing with creatively styled French cuisines spiced up with more modern tastes. The wine cellar houses a great collection as well. Be it a business dinner or a family event, Alain Ducasse is a perfect spot. It opens from Tuesday till Saturday.

2) MAC N CHEESE- SPUNTINO

Spuntino is an Italian-American style restaurant with its setting imported from America. Perhaps, this accounts for their mean Mac n Cheese. It’s a small place with a bar like setting, perfect for people who just like to concentrate on the yummy food.

Their strong cocktails add a nice touch to the meal. They play scratchy blues over the speakers which suits the atmosphere just fine. Spuntino is located at Soho and is open all week. Remember they have limited stools.

3) ENGLISH RESTAURANTS- SIMPSON’ S IN THE STRAND

Simpson’s in the Strand allows you to do a little tourism while eating. The place is very old and is in a building that also houses on of the most famous hotels in the world, the Savoy. The restaurant started, although much more modestly, as far back as 1828 and is located at Trafalgar Square.

From Scottish scallops to prime rib, Simpson’s in the Strand serves hem all essentially English. The environment is classic and the taste of their meals are divine. In fact, some say you haven’t done London until you have done Simpson’s.

4) SEA FOOD- WRIGHT BROTHERS

Since making their debut in 2005, Wright Brothers has since made waves in the sea food faculty across all of London. One would almost mistake London for an island with the sea food delicacy this family owned restaurant pumps out.

From crab dishes to oysters and octopus meals, the dishes will not leave you wanting. The service will have you taking out your phone for a picture before you dig in. It is that good. Their original place is at Borough Market.

5) CHINESE RESTAURANT- MIN JIANG

As they say, you can never go wrong with Chinese. Not only is Min Jiang an amazing restaurant, the view is breath-taking as well. The restaurant overlooks the beautiful Kensington Gardens. The braised pork belly and the noodles are worthy experiences.

The restaurant offers vegan and gluten free options that come with a wide palate. Although you have to reserve at Min Jiang in advance. The restaurant is located at St. Kensington and is open every day.


All of these restaurants are just one to suit different tastes and moods and they promise the most beautiful food experiences.

The England North Bank City of Preston

Preston was named England’s most improved city in 2018. This laurel was worth winning for this ancient city.

A Street in Preston

Preston is a city on the north bank of the River Ribble in North England. It is the administrative center of Lancashire County. As of 2017, Preston was estimated to have a population of 141, 300. Like other British Isles, Preston has a temperate maritime climate.

History:

Preston was formerly a water village. It was developed from an Anglican settlement around the 7th century. The name was derived from ‘Priest’s town’ and was later changed to Preston. The village became a town in the 12th century.

At the time, Preston served as the main road between Northern and Southern England. As Preston was a major market scene, it had stone gates for charging goods entering the town. Preston was also a stage for some national battles: the 1648 Battle between Cromwell and the Duke of Hamilton and the defeat of the Jacobites in 1715.

Preston became the seat of the new county council in 1882. Preston by-pass was the nation’s first motorway and it worked greatly in addressing traffic problems.

The town’s old homes, factories and buildings were soon demolished to accommodate modernist county buildings. Preston escaped serious bombing during the Second World War but a plane crashed into it in 1944. 66 people died from the crash.

The present University of Lancashire can be traced as far back as the Preston Sunday School in 1830. Preston became a city in 2002.  

Governance:

Preston is divided into two Westminster constituencies namely; Preston and Wyre and Preston North. The seat of the Lancashire County Council is in Fishergate. Preston is run by Preston City Council with the urban settlements having 19 out of 20 seats.

Landmarks and Tourist Attractions:

The tallest non-cathedral church spire in England is St. Walburge. The church spire can be seen from almost anywhere in the city. Preston bus station was built in the 1960s and is one of the largest bus stations in England.

Harris Museum is a Victorian style building which houses arts and artifacts. The building also overlooks the Flag Market. Preston Cenotaph is a monument for Preston soldiers lost during the World War I and World War II.

Other memorable places are the River Ribble, Samlesbury Hall, Deepdale Stadium, Preston Docks, Miller Arcade, Astley Hall, Smithy Farm and the Blackburn Cathedral.

Economy:

Preston is a booming economic world. The city has never lost its touch for commercial activities. Preston has above average improvement in the health, transport, labour and transportation sectors. Preston houses The Carphone Warehouse, Skittles and The Westinghouse Electric Company. It also houses the popular aerospace company, BAE Systems.

Due to Preston’s location, there are a lot of freight and haulage companies. Preston was named in 2018 as England’s most improved city.  

Sports:

Preston is a home of football, the city used to house the National Football Museum before it was moved to Manchester. Preston North End FC was one of the founders of the Football League. The team was the first crowned English Football Champions. The team plays at Deepdale Football Ground.

Preston also has a female football team; Dick Kerr’s Ladies FC which won the first two seasons of the Football League.

Preston Grasshoppers RFC plays in the third tier of the English rugby union. Other sports established in the city include mountaineering, hockey, roller derby, cycle reaching and speedway racing.

Nightlife: 

Preston does not have the best nightlife in England, but the city isn’t dead either. Preston provides some amazingly cheap pubs, live music from top bands, and lots of clubs.

Conclusion:

Preston is a great city to live in. There are amazing business opportunities and a host of historical centers one can visit to help unwind after work. It certainly fits in as an amazing stop on the list of the leading UK destinations.

Welcome to Coventry

UK Destinations attract people from all over the globe. Coventry presents its unique allure.

UK Destinations

Art UK Image

One of the largest cities in the United Kingdom, 12th in particular; Coventry is the most central city in the whole of England.

Through the years, with a population of 360,100 Coventry has become a major participant in the industrial base of the United Kingdom with its motor companies dominant in the UK.

History

It is home to two universities: Coventry University and the University of Warwick giving it a significant amount of student population.

Coventry has a lot of history dating back to its early occupation by the Roman empire. It started as a settlement for the expanding Romans and a nunnery was built alongside the settlement. It was later brought to ruins by an invading Danish army.

The ruins were built upon by Leofric of Mercia and his wife into a monastery. A market had stated around its gates and slowly, Coventry became a settlement for the English.

In the 14th century, Coventry became a thriving center of cloth trade and became on of the most important towns in England. It eventually became a county in its own right in 1451 after claiming the status of a city and granted a Charter of Incorporation in 1345.

Following a decline in its Watch and Clock trade in the 18th century, Coventry became a thriving place for bicycles and in the 19th and 20th century for cars, motorcycles and even airplanes and has retained its status as a major industrial city in the United Kingdom.

Governance:

Coventry is administered by Coventry City Council, controlled since 2010 by the Labor Party, and led since 2016 by George Duggins. The city is divided up into 18 Wards each with three councilors. The chairman of the council is the Lord Mayor, who has a casting vote.

Landmarks and Tourist attractions:

St Michael’s Cathedral is the best known of all Coventry’s tourist attractions with its old structure bombed by the Germans in World War II. Its new structure was built alongside the old. The cathedral has made Coventry one of Europe’s major cities of peace and reconciliation with an annual Peace Month celebration.

Other attractions are Coventry City Farm, Herbert art gallery and museum and Coventry Transport Museum among others.

Economy:

Being an industrial base, Coventry main industries include cars, electronic equipment, telecommunications equipment, man-made fibers and aerospace components.

Although its car industries have declined almost to the point of extinction, in the recent years, the industrial components have moved towards business, scientific research and leisurely centered business activities.

Sport:

Coventry is an active participant of various sports with sport teams spanning major activities like football with Coventry City FC as their only professional football club, ice hockey, field hockey, rugby, athletics and racing of which most prominent are the Speedway and Stock car racing.

Night life:

Though compared to most cities, Coventry seems to have an average nightlife. Its nightlife is cool as pubs are bars like Kabash, Skydome, The Phoenix, Rainbows and Rosie Malones are available all week for hanging out and relaxation.

It is also a city rich with student population courtesy of two universities; with this, the nightlife is guaranteed to be impressive rather than disappointing.

Looking Ahead:

 Coventry having a rich history spanning the Roman conquest up till date is a stronghold of political and industrial significance in the United Kingdom.

Its place in terms of population, economics and politics will rather continue on the increase more now than ever.